Copyright 2018 AIA Iowa

Welcome to the 2019 AIA Iowa Convention.

Join us September 26-27 in Des Moines for our annual convention.

Earn up to 11 CEUs when you attend 4 fantastic keynote presentations, 4 workshops of your choice, and 2 BONUS free educational opportunities in our exhibit hall.

You'll find topics ranging from building codes to building comfort and historic renovation to modern innovation. From curtain walls until the curtain falls, you're sure to get the education and connections that you need.

Scroll through to view schedule, read course descriptions, make note of your workshops, and register

OR

view our 2019 Convention Brochure PDF

Pricing:
Attendee Type
AIA Member (AIA, Prof. Affiliate, Hon. AIA, Int'l AIA)
Assoc. AIA Member
Pella AXP Sponsored Registration (Assoc. AIA Member enrolled in AXP)
Emeritus Member
Full-time ISU Dept. of Architecture Student or Faculty
Non-Member
Spouse
Full experience*
$307 
$227
$154
(with promo code)
Early Bird (Full)*
$232
$192
$137
Build your experience**
$247
$167
$94      
(with promo code)
Early Bird (Build)**
$172
$132
$77
$0 (option to add on workshops and/or lunch(es) during registration)
$0 (option to add on lunch(es) during registration)
$367   
$115    
$292
$80
$307
$232
Full experience*

BEST VALUE! The complete convention experience- Includes all 4 workshop sessions (1 FREE!), all lunches, and refreshments.

Build your experience**

Includes all lunches and refreshments. Choose and purchase the workshops you can attend in your registration for $20 each.

REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED. YOU CAN STILL REGISTER ONSITE.

Schedule

Thursday September 26
7:00
a Registration Opens
7:00 Exhibit Hall Open/Continental Breakfast


8:00 Welcome
8:15 Speaker: JoAnn Wilcox, AIA (1.25 LU HSW)


9:30 Exhibit Hall Open / Refreshments 


10:45 Workshop Session 1: 1 LU or LU HSW 

1. Exterior CI: Advanced Ideas on Fire, H20, & Thermal Performance (HSW)

2. The Harkin Institute: Universal Inclusion and eco-Wellness (HSW)

3. Liability Insurance for A/Es

4. Prairie Hill Co-Housing: a Green, Neighbor-Centered Development (HSW)

5. The Fair Housing Act Design & Construction Requirements (HSW)

6. A Study in Glass: Krause Gateway Center (HSW)


11:45 Lunch with Exhibitors
*You must have indicated on your registration to attend


1:15 p Workshop Session 2: 1 LU or LU HSW 

7. Why an Architect? Why You?

8. Requirements of doors, windows and shutters in Tornado Shelter (HSW)

9. Workplace and Workforce Trends, Their Impacts + Your Regional Perspective

10. Campus Decarbonization: Prioritizing your Approach (HSW)

11. Battle between budget and well-being (HSW)

12. Renderings Don't Count: Realizing Challenging Structures & Facade (HSW)


2:15 Exhibit Hall Open / Refreshments 


3:45 Speaker: Erin Sterling Lewis, AIA & Matt Griffith, AIA (1.25 LU HSW)


5:00 Cocktail Party/Exhibit Hall Open 
6:00 Door Prize Drawing 


7:00 Awards Celebration

Friday September 21
7:45
 a Registration Opens
7:45 Feed Your Future: Emerging Professionals Breakfast

7:45 Exhibit Hall Open/Continental Breakfast

 

8:15 Masonry Institute Architectural Design Awards
8:30 Speaker: Stephen Cassell, FAIA (1.25 LU HSW)


9:45 Exhibit Hall Open / Refreshments 


11:15 Workshop Session 3: 1 LU or LU HSW

13. Harassment Bystander Intervention Training (HSW)

15. Attack the Gap to Win 3X the Pursuits

16. The impact of urban trees on energy use and passive survivability (HSW)

17. Sensible (Sustainable) Transitions:  New Life for Old Structures (HSW)

18. Moisture Management: Maximize Your Envelope & Minimize Your Risk (HSW)


12:15 p Lunch
*You must have indicated on your registration to attend

1:00 AIA Iowa Business Meeting/Legislative Forum
 

2:00 Break

2:15 Workshop Session 4: 1 LU or LU HSW  

19. NCARB & You: AXP, ARE, Licensure, & Certification

20. Overview of Recent Changes to the Rules of Professional Practice (HSW)

21. Built Environment & Energy Innovations (HSW)

22. Air Barriers and Air Leakage in Buildings (HSW)

23. Grinnell College - Designing the Campus for the Future

24. Future Vernaculars: Dwelling Ecosystems for Pacific Atolls (HSW)



3:15 Break/Refreshments 


3:30 Speaker: Brandon Pace, FAIA (1.25 LU HSW)

Keynote Speakers

JoAnn Hindmarsh Wilcox, AIA

Mahlum

Seattle, WA

Conscious Design - Motivation for Action and Impact

Conscious design is born of empathy. Empathy carries the power to quash biases and preconceptions which can limit a designers' ability to understand and solve the most meaningful problems in the most impactful way. When architects actively seek out conscious design and embrace its value as a driver of re-harnessing awareness and humility into how and what we design, we gift ourselves richer and unexpected territories when ideating. This program will explore the motivation for action and impact in Mahlum's recent public works; civic projects widely recognized for empowering individuals and communities in the spaces and places they live, learn and heal.

 

By attending this keynote address participants will:

· Identify the levers that all architects can push which support environmental, physical and mental health.

· Understand the importance of space to empower communities by exploring case studies that move the dial on core community projects such as schools, hospitals and urban infrastructure and how they impact the health and safety of society.

· Practice empathy in your architectural process to gain quicker traction to empower individuals and communities in the spaces and places they live, learn and heal

· Investigate your agency as an architect to change the world through conscious design.

Workshop Tracks

Emerging Professionals

1. Exterior CI: Advanced Ideas on Fire, H20, & Thermal

7. Why an Architect? Why You?

13. Harassment Bystander Intervention Training

19. NCARB & You: AXP, ARE, Licensure, & Certification

Above & Beyond Code Compliance

2. The Harkin Institute: Universal Inclusion and eco-Wellness

8. Requirements of doors, windows and shutters in Tornado Shelter

20. Overview of Recent Changes to the Rules of Professional Practice

Best Business Practices

3. Liability Insurance for A/Es

9. Workplace and Workforce Trends, Their Impacts + Your Region

15. Attack the Gap to Win 3X the Pursuits

21. Built Environment & Energy Innovations

Built Environment & Energy Innovations

4. Prairie Hill Co-Housing: a Green, Neighbor-Centered Development

10. Campus Decarbonization: Prioritizing your Approach

16. The impact of urban trees on energy use and passive survivability

22. Air Barriers and Air Leakage in Buildings

SENSABILITY

5. The Fair Housing Act Design & Construction Requirements

11. Battle between budget and well-being

17. Sensible (Sustainable) Transitions:  New Life for Old Structures

23. Grinnell College - Designing the Campus for the Future

Design Discovery

6. A Study in Glass: Krause Gateway Center

12. Renderings Don't Count: Realizing Challenging Structures & Facade

18. Moisture Management: Maximize Your Envelope & Minimize Your Issues

24. Future Vernaculars: Dwelling Ecosystems for Pacific Atolls

Workshop Descriptions

Workshop Session 1   ​

Thursday, September 26, 10:45 a.m.-11:45 a.m.

 

1. Exterior CI: Advanced Ideas on Fire, H20, & Thermal Performance [Emerging Professionals Track]​

Design practices in framed wall construction rely largely on exterior insulation to comply with current energy codes and continuous insulation requirements. New challenges accompany this paradigm shift, including implications for NFPA285 compliant wall assemblies, tolerance to wetting events, and the continuity of thermal layers. This presentation examines the performance of exterior insulation in response to the demanding conditions found in modern rainscreens and masonry veneer cavities.  Particular emphasis is placed on NFPA285 compliance, thermal bridging, moisture transport, and the effects of wind-washing in ventilated rainscreens. These advanced perspectives will empower professionals to design, specify, install, & achieve the benefits of exterior insulation while avoiding its unintended consequences.

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Understand current building code requirements and testing methodologies for fire propagation and smoke development. Given assembly testing following the Grenfell tragedy, attendees will better understand fire propagation in relation to actual material properties and performance. Review material properties governing moisture and air performance as they pertain to conditions encountered in rainscreens and masonry veneers so as to best understand the performance characteristics of insulation specification choices. Understand conditions that pose unique challenges, including multiple drain planes, drainage efficiencies, increased water absorption, and water vapor transmission.  Recognize risks associated with exterior insulation when used in combination with cavity insulation, interior vapor retarders, and low-perm water-resistive barriers. Understand the effects of wind-washing and convective heat loss in modern rainscreen systems. Identify and prevent conditions that jeopardize the thermal insulation layer, which may in turn affect moisture transfer and overall wall performance.

 

Presented by: Lance Williams, Atlas Roof & Wall Corporation (1 LU HSW)

 

2. The Harkin Institute: Universal Inclusion and eco-Wellness [Above & Beyond Code Compliance Track]​

The Harkin Insitute (THI) promotes understanding of the issues to which former Senator Tom Harkin devoted his career, including his historic legislation, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The Institute will go beyond the ADA to set a new standard for universal and inclusive design. The presentation will describe universal design strategies which go beyond the accessibility minimums set by the ADA, and strategies for inclusive design the ADA does not address. The presentation will also discuss how the project goes above and beyond code to promote environmental wellness, including stormwater bio-management and energy use.

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Universal Design Project Planning: The engagement process that informed the development of the design. Universal Design Strategies: Description of strategies employed at The Harkin Institute which will support a greater variety of users and empower them to safely and enjoyably engage with and navigate within the space. Inclusive Design Case Study: Direct-access gender inclusive restroom model designed for The Harkin Institute, including path of compliance for Des Moines PDC. Environmental Wellness: Strategies to promote a healthy environment, including stormwater management on-site, energy modeling process, and energy use strategies.
 

Presented by: Lana Zoet, AIA, Kevin Nordmeyer, AIA, Jason Kruse, AIA, BNIM Architects (1 LU HSW) 

 

3. Liability Insurance for A/Es [Best Business Practices Track]

This presentation provides a great overview of insurance including professional liability, general liability, workers compensation, employer’s liability, automobile liability, excess and umbrella coverages. Additionally, this course includes key information about certificates of insurance, and the difference between claims-made and occurrence type policies. This course will empower the attendees with risk management information. Most importantly, we will get to the "WHY" behind the questions and requests you get from contractors and subconsultants and why it matters!

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Understand the basics regarding certificates of insurance and what they do, what they don’t do and when you need one. Learn the difference between professional liability and commercial general liability insurance, including occurrence versus claims-made reporting of claims. Identify the major types of other insurance needed by design professionals including worker’s compensation, employer’s liability, automobile liability, excess insurance and umbrella coverage. Discover risk management tools for preventing and lessening losses regardless of your insurance policy

limits.

 

Presented by: Nick Maletta, AIA Iowa Allied Member, Holmes Murphy & Associates (1 LU) 

 

4. Prairie Hill Co-Housing: a Green, Neighbor-Centered Development [Built Environment & Energy Innovations Track]

Ten years ago a group of Iowa City residents launched the development of a co-housing community: 36 eco-friendly residences clustered around a shared pedestrian-only green space within a short walk to community gardens and orchards. Today, half of the LEED registered units are complete. Achieving verifiable high energy and acoustical performance in multi-family units have challenged the contractor, architect, and community members. Community representatives will share the history and challenges of this journey and the Construction Administration architect will discuss strategies used to translate design intent to measurable building performance.
 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Understand what distinguishes a co-housing community from conventional development. Articulate the tension between constructability and high-performance details for fire, acoustics, thermal performance. Describe key aspects of detailing and constructing wood-framed structures to achieve a tight envelope. Identify design opportunities to accommodate changes in household composition and different physical abilities.

 

Presented by: Martha Norbeck, AIA, C-Wise Design and Del Holland Prairie Hill Co-Housing (1 LU HSW)

 

5. The Fair Housing Act Design & Construction Requirements: [SENSABILITY Track]

Common Design and Construction Violations and Solutions: Everyone needs a place to live. Federal civil rights laws protect those with disabilities from discrimination in all aspects of daily life, including housing. The Fair Housing Act and its Accessibility Guidelines provide the multifamily housing industry with design and construction requirements that ensure a more inclusive housing stock. Violations may be common, but avoidable, if the design community becomes well informed. This training module examines the most common design and construction violations of the Fair Housing Act Guidelines and offers appropriate remedies for correcting these problems. Participants will be provided with practical and feasible solutions to the most common mistakes that can be made during design and construction.

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Understand and responsibly apply the seven design and construction requirements of the Fair Housing Accessibility Guidelines in designing/constructing multifamily dwellings that are more usable by all inhabitants. Identify violations of the Fair Housing Accessibility Guidelines, avoid violations, and ultimately understand how to manipulate the parts of a required element to resolve a violation with a realistic solution. To become conscious and gain an awareness of the impacts of non-compliance on persons with differing abilities. Obtain resources to aid the architect/designer in complying with the Fair Housing Accessibility Guidelines.

 

Presented by: John Ritzu and Douglas Anderson, LCM Architects (1 LU HSW)

 

6. A Study in Glass: Krause Gateway Center [Design Discovery Track]

At the heart of Krause Gateway Center’s design was the desire for a light-filled space that opened a dialogue between those who work in the building, the public and the city. The building’s nearly all-glass envelope was key to bringing this design to life.  Attendees will get a behind-the-scenes look into how the team achieved a sleek, simple and elegant facade, while containing some of the largest glass lites and most robust curtainwall systems in the country. In addition, attendees will learn about the crucial interfaces between the structure, structural movements, and the other trades on the project.

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Understand the interface between the glass, structure, and how the glazing system responds to structural movements. Understand how to create a thermal break in an all glass system. Understand how to tie an all glass system into the building air barrier. Understand the complexity involved with the installation of large format glass units, and the coordination of interrelated systems from mockup through completion.  

 

Presented by: Brad Davison-Rippey, AIA, Ryan Keairnes, Ryan Smart, and Chris Portz, AWS (1 LU HSW)

 

Workshop Session 2

Thursday, September 26, 1:15 p.m.-2:15 p.m.

 

7. Why an Architect? Why You? [Emerging Professionals Track]

Can you imagine what it would be like if your best client thought you weren't any different from your competitors? What if the client whose work you're trying to win thinks you're the same as everyone else? What about the employees you need to retain or the people you're trying to recruit? What if they thought your company was no different than anywhere else they have the opportunity to work? Relevance of an architect may seem like a foreign concept, but that's really what we're talking about. If you look the same, sound the same, and act the same as everyone else, you're no more relevant than anyone else and you're certainly considered a commodity. The clients you're pursuing, your employees, and the employees you're trying to recruit all have lots of options and they're all asking the same question: “Why should I choose you?” In a world where company leaders say a huge percentage of their business comes from repeat clients and referrals, even your best clients are asking, “Why should I continue to choose you?” AND “Why should I refer you to my friends and colleagues?” They're all wondering if there's any reason they should choose you or continue to choose you over one of your competitors. Communicating a clear, concise, and compelling answer to “Why should I choose you?” is critical to the sustainability of your organization. Helping everyone in your organization answer “Why should I choose you?” is the most important work you can do today.
 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: After this session, participants will be able to explain why having a clear, compelling answer to the question, “Why should I choose you?” is critical to the survival of their firm. After this session, participants will be able to explain why architects lack relevance in some clients' eyes and why they're being commoditized. After this session, participants will be able to craft a clear, concise message that compels clients and employees to choose them. After this session, participants will be able to communicate in a neuroscience-based way that resonates with their clients and employees.

 

Presented by: Jeff Echols, Assoc. AIA, echoEngagement (1 LU)

 

8. Requirements of doors, windows and shutters in Tornado Shelter [Above & Beyond Code Compliance Track]

The International Building Code 2015 requires that all new critical facilities such as schools, emergency operations centers, police stations and fire stations if built in the 250mph wind zone must include a safe room meeting ICC500-14 and FEMA361-15 large enough to house the entire population of the building.  This course will be an in-depth review of testing and labeling requirements as well as design considerations for windows and doors meeting ICC500-14 and FEMA361-15 for use in Tornado and Hurricane shelters mandated by the IBC-2015.
 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: When do window, doors and shutters need to meet ICC500-14 and FEMA361-15. What are the testing requirements of windows, doors and shutters for use in tornado and hurricane safe rooms. What are the labeling and certification requirements of windows, doors and shutters meeting ICC500-14 for use in storm shelters. What are some design considerations for windows, doors and shutters when designing a safe room

 

Presented by: Gerry Sagerman, Insulgard Security Products (1 LU HSW)

 

9. Workplace and Workforce Trends, Their Impacts + Your Regional Perspective [Best Business Practices Track]

An engaging research dialogue surrounding shifting forces of real estate and the work force at large.  Get ready to debate the implications of increased flexibility, transparency and emerging impact of the consumer economy on corporate real estate and organizational practices.  She will present salient, evolving drivers of the workplace in an engaging conversation to challenge your thinking during this timely exploration of workplace strategy. 

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Deepen your understanding of radically shifting talent demographics. Understand shifting demographics of the eminent shrinking talent pool. Consumerism of workplace: diversifying work styles and their alignment with the physical space. Tightening real estate demands and the resulting tensions.

 

Presented by: Jenny West, Knoll, Inc.  (1 LU)

 

10. Campus Decarbonization: Prioritizing your Approach [Built Environment & Energy Innovations Track]

Colleges and Universities around the country recognize the importance of being a leader to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions.  Many have signed the American College and University President's Climate Commitment and have set a campus carbon neutrality goal.  As carbon neutrality dates approach, optimal pathways to campus decarbonization need to be identified and implemented.  These pathways must balance existing system inertia, energy efficiency and carbon footprint while maintaining fiscal responsibility.  This presentation will examine current trends and strategies to try to accomplish these goals.
 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Determine how to design the most energy efficient systems for a campus. Identify how power generation from the grid has progressed to reduce carbon emissions and how that will affect your campus. Identify options to achieve deep decarbonization for your campus. Identify opportunities to reduce carbon emissions in a fiscally responsible way.
 

Presented by: Michael Luster, MEP Associates (1 LU HSW)

 

11. Battle between budget and well-being [SENSABILITY Track]

The built environment is an asset to maximizing human potential and cultivating well-being. This session explores the intersection between budgets, human health and energy conservation.  We will share a sensitivity analysis showing the impact of energy efficiency strategies on occupant comfort and well-being for multiple building types across climate zones. We will also discuss budget impacts and best practices from different building rating systems for a range of building type and how they impact occupant comfort, well-being and energy efficiency.

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Recognize the importance of designing towards occupant comfort and the strategies that relate energy efficiency and occupant comfort for different building types. Assist clients in understanding the energy portfolio of their project based on building type and climate zone. Understand the sensitivity certain design parameters on the energy cost of building types located in different climate zones. Review LEED and WELL rating system best practices, finding a balance between quantity and quality.
 

Presented by: Vinoth Sekar, Willdan, AIA Iowa Allied Member (1 LU HSW)

 

12. Renderings Don't Count: Realizing Challenging Structures & Facade [Design Discover Track]

Renderings Don’t Count is about realizing the vision on the most ambitious designs. Our case studies illustrate ways these designs have been achieved and the process and technologies used. The case studies include structures, facades and in most cases the holistic integration of both to find synergies, efficiency and thermal performance. The solutions use conventional systems in unconventional ways; advanced materials such as ultra high performance concrete, reinforced polymers, carbon fiber and structural glass. The discussion will not just be about the solution to the problem but why the solution was chosen. When designing these systems, the answer to “Why?” is important to achieving the most appropriate solution to the project’s challenges, whether they be geometry, performance, efficiency, or cost. For each of the subjects multiple case studies will be reviewed to show the means that these concepts, systems and rules can be used and manipulated to meet the projects parameters and vision.  The course will demonstrate how early collaboration of a skilled team can help make even the most challenging designs evolve from rendering to built work.
 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Upon completion participants will increase their ability to specify and design cantilevered structural systems using synergistic geometries of span and depth that enhance rather than detract from the architecture. Upon completion participants will be able to specify and design using facade systems that utilize tension in a manner to create long span higher performance glazing systems. Upon completion participants will be able to specify and design using fiber reinforced polymers and other strategies to develop non-proprietary structural thermal breaks and thermally broken enclosure systems. Upon completion participants will be able to develop strategies to make use of computational design, digital fabrication and panellization to realize complex projects with tight schedules and site constraints.
 

Presented by: Christopher O’Hara, Studio NYL (1 LU HSW)

 

Workshop Session 3
Friday, September 27, 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

 

13. Harassment Bystander Intervention Training [Emerging Professionals Track]
Experiences of harassment in the design professions have increasingly been brought to light in recent years, fostering new awareness of the forms that identity-based discrimination can take, and the extent to which it not only harms individual but erodes the potential of our profession. Meaningful change doesn't have to come from the top down; it can come from any person in a workplace. Bystanders can help take the burden off of people who experience these types of harm, and in the process, make architectural workplaces better environments. This workshop will share effective tools that bystanders can use to support their colleagues. Participants will discuss what to look for and learn about a wide range options for intervening and addressing harm.

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Attendees will be able to identify common workplace and job site scenarios in which language and behavior can cause harm to marginalized individuals or groups of people. (i.e. what to look out for and why it's harmful). By learning about common forms of harassment and mistreatment, attendees will be able identify internalized patterns of thought and behavior that they themselves want to unlearn. Attendees will learn tools for intervening in harmful behavior, ranging from direct intervention to indirect forms of support. They'll learn how to use active listening,  supportive language, common language to avoid, and grounding techniques to help someone who is anxious as a result of harassment. Attendees will learn easy ways to productively talk about harassment and mistreatment with their colleagues, and share tactics from the training with others.

 

Presented by: Alison Brunn, Assoc. AIA, Substance Architecture (1 LU HSW)

  

15. Attack the Gap to Win 3X the Pursuits [Best Business Practices Track]

The national average hit rate for architecture firms is about 20%, but there are firms that are winning 50%, 60%, and even more of the projects they pursue. About 70% of the fact-finding, opinion forming, and decision making is done before the request reaches you. Most of the selection process actually happens before you even know there’s a project out there. If your hit rate is near the national average, that means a gap has opened between how you’re developing new business and the way your prospects are really hiring. Are you trying to win in the last 30% (trying to make the shortlist and hoping to win in the interview) or are you attacking the 70% ahead of the RFP? Times are changing. We’re in an accelerating age where distraction and commoditization are rising, and loyalty is declining. The availability of technology and information is increasing and the amount of time you have to pitch is shrinking. With up to 70% of the buyer’s journey done before your team even shows up, you have to pitch perfectly at every opportunity to make the next cut. This Compressed Selling Time, mixed with the drive toward Commoditization, and the move toward Consensus Decision-Making, and you’re now feeling the headwinds to future revenue and margin growth; the Three Deadly Cs. You have to be able to align your marketing and business development with the way your prospects are really buying, but with only 30% of the journey available to you, and the ability to answer “Why you? Why now?” more important than ever, how do you attack the gap? During this session, you’ll develop a new outlook on what their buyer’s journey really looks like so you can connect your value to their deepest threats in a way that gets you ahead of the RFP (and your competition).

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: After attending this session, participants will be able to explain the Three Deadly Cs. After attending this session, participants will be able to develop a plan to attack the gap between traditional marketing and business development and the way prospects are really hiring today. After attending this session, participants will be able to explain the most effective way to get ahead of the RFP process. After attending this session, participants will be able to develop a communications frame work to apply to website, marketing collateral, elevator pitch, and even live interview situations.
 

Presented by: Jeff Echols, Assoc. AIA echoEngagement (1 LU)

 

16. The impact of urban trees on energy use and passive survivability [Built Environment & Energy Innovations Track]

Trees in urban landscapes can modify temperatures in the nearby environment, which is important for reducing summer heat loads on building surfaces. Trees can reduce energy use and improve indoor and outdoor comfort for cooling in summer by casting shade and providing evapotranspirational (ET) cooling. This workshop presents a methodology to combine spatially explicit three-dimensional tree morphology and estimates of ET rates with building location and wall characteristic data to test their relative contribution to building energy consumption. Based on a comprehensive tree inventory and remotely sensed land surface temperature which indicate urban heat island effect for a Des Moines neighborhood, tree morphology and building data have been integrated in a three-dimensional array in the “Urban Modeling Interface” to estimate cooling due to interception of sunlight. We then created a mesh surface that includes trees and buildings to incorporate in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to simulate ET cooling. The workshop will present first results of the CFD modeling for latent heat transfer in the vicinity of urban trees.
 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Participants will be able to understand the variables and inputs for an urban energy model. Participants will be able to evaluate the impact of trees on neighborhood energy consumption. Participants will be able to understand the impact of urban heat island effects on the variety of neighborhoods in Des Moines as a case study. Participants will be able to evaluate the data sources needed to evaluate trees impact on building energy use and indoor climate conditions.

 

Presented by: Ulrike Passe, AIA, and Breanna Marmur Iowa State University (1 LU HSW)

 

17. Sensible (Sustainable) Transitions:  New Life for Old Structures [SENSABILITY Track]

Retrofitting existing buildings can be a cost-effective path to sustainability. This course explores the evolution of the building envelope and strategies to create energy efficiency in existing structures while simultaneously ensuring long-term performance.  Construction techniques, design intent, chemistry of assemblies, and thermal models will be used to illustrate the positive impact as well as the unintended consequences of a variety of potential modifications as they relate to re-purposing historic and existing buildings.  This workshop will identify successful approaches that architects and building owners can take to improve the energy efficiency of existing buildings. 

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Analyze existing wall construction to understand the existing performance criteria to incorporate energy improvements in a manner that does not accelerate deterioration of the wall. Understand techniques available to improve energy performance and air quality through improvements to existing masonry and fenestrations. Understand where the dewpoint occurs in the existing wall assemblies and how that affects the placement and replacement of existing openings. Describe the community development benefits and greenhouse gas reduction by retrofitting existing buildings.

 

Presented by: Mark Guetzko Seedorff Masonry, Inc. / AWS, AIA Iowa Allied Member (1 LU HSW)

 

18. Moisture Management: Maximize Your Envelope & Minimize Your Issues [Design Discovery Track]

Our presentation will focus on moisture issues in building envelopes, how to estimate the envelope performance, and on innovations in glazing. Designing an envelope that reduces the risk of moisture issues reduces liability and increases client satisfaction for both architects and engineers. The goal of this presentation is to help you maximize that satisfaction with your clients.

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Understand how condensation and high relative humidity can increase the risk of respiratory illnesses. Understand how to calculate/estimate the likelihood of condensation. Know the options for glazing with extremely high performance to prevent or minimize condensation, minimize solar gain when not desirable, and open options for higher percentages of glazing. Understand glazing options that reduce the risk of explosion and other damage to occupants and the compromises related to clear vision and insulating value.

 

Presented by: Jeff Boldt and Ryan LePera IMEG Corp (1 LU HSW)

 

Workshop Session 4
Friday, September 27, 2:15 p.m.-3:15 p.m.

 

19. NCARB & You: AXP, ARE, Licensure, & Certification [Emerging Professionals Track]

The presentation will review the steps necessary to achieve licensure to become an architect and other programs to get the most out of your career in architecture.

 

Topics will include:

Background of NCARB

The entities involved in the licensure process

How to progress successfully through the Architectural Experience Program® (AXP™)

What to expect with the Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®)

Recent changes to NCARB programs

Value of the NCARB Certificate
 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Understand the requirements for completing AXP, ARE and becoming licensed. Learn how the licensure process changes with the profession. Understand ways to engage the licensure process and the benefits for the profession. Identify tools and resources available.

 

Presented by: Harry Falconer, NCARB (1 LU)

 

20. Overview of Recent Changes to the Rules of Professional Practice [Above & Beyond Code Compliance Track]

There still exists some confusion among design professionals and building officials as to the requirements of the laws governing the practice of architecture, engineering, and landscape architecture. In 2015, the Iowa Architectural Examining Board (IAEB) formed a task force to address this confusion. The first step being aligning the differing terminology between the IAEB rules language and model building code language.  The second step was to refresh the Building Code Officials’ Handbook to assist in the application of these governing regulations. The IAEB took the approach that code officials are the "boots on the ground" in enforcement, particularly when determining when involvement of a licensed professional would be required for a project.  The closer terms and definitions within the rules and law can be with the common enforcement language in the construction industry, the less chance there is for confusion or dispute.  The resulting changes to the definitions contained in Chapter 5 (Exceptions) of Section 193B (Architectural Examining Board) of the Iowa Administrative Code provide a clearer direction when applying State regulations by aligning with model building code language and became effective on July 25, 2018.  Work to update the handbook will soon be complete. This course will provide a summary of the changes and updates to of the IAEB Rules and the Building Code Officials’ Handbook related to when a licensed design professional is or is not required for a project.
 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Summarize the exceptions to the requirement for an architect licensed in the state is required to perform professional architectural services for all buildings, and how recent revisions aligned the definitions used for the exception language with model building codes. Describe occupancy types or size and height restrictions that meet the threshold requiring a licensed professional to perform planning and design services in connection with a project. Understand the permissible overlaps and cross-scope activities among various design professions in the design and documentation of a building. Recognize the local building code official’s responsibility for determining that construction documents adequately describe a building project which, when completed, will meet the applicable codes and protect the health, safety and welfare of the public.

 

Presented by: Linda Schemmel, AIA, City of West Des Moines, Ljerka Vasiljevic, AIA State Fire Marshal’s Building Code Bureau, and Terry Berk, City of Des Moines (1 HSW LU)

 

21. Built Environment & Energy Innovations [Best Business Practices Track]

Frequently owners and design teams have perceptions regarding the best efficiency options for their buildings.  When energy modeling reveals a different story, it can lead to confusion.  Establishing an early connection with the owner and design team and using data- driven results to support the decision- making process forges a pathway to success.  This session will re-establish the importance of understanding how a specific building uses energy, and what factors impact it.  Attendees will understand the common scenarios where favored technologies fall short, and rules-of-thumb no long apply.  Finally, we will explore ways to integrate the data- driven results into the optimal package of energy efficiency solutions for each unique building.

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Identify common early design assumptions that often may not align with whole-building energy analysis. Analyze the major factors that can affect building energy use and viability of efficiency strategies. Compare building model scenarios to see how the value of energy efficiency measures changes. Demonstrate how energy analysis results can be best integrated into an owner and design team’s selection of an optimal package of efficiency solutions.
 

Presented by: Jacob Serfling, Willdan, AIA Iowa Allied Member (1 HSW LU)

 

22. Air Barriers and Air Leakage in Buildings [Built Environment & Energy Innovations Track]

This presentation describes the basics of a continuous air barrier and why limiting air leakage with a continuous air barrier saves energy.  It explains how to comply with air leakage and continuous air barrier requirements in national energy codes, including how precast concrete can comply.  An overview of compliance paths of these energy codes is presented as well.

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Learn why limiting air leakage with a continuous air barrier saves energy. Identify the components of a continuous air barrier. Determine how to comply with air leakage and continuous air barrier requirements in national energy codes. Identify some challenges of air leakage testing of buildings as a means of compliance with national energy codes.

 

Presented by: Martha VanGeem, VanGeem Consulting (1 LU HSW)

 

23. Grinnell College - Designing the Campus for the Future [SENSABILITY Track]

The program will provide a case study of the extensive work that has been done and is currently in process at the Grinnell College campus, with a focus on accessibility, sustainability, energy efficiency, and meeting the needs of future students. The projects featured will be an overview of the Humanities and Social Studies Center, Younkers Hall, the Admissions & Financial Services Building, and the Campus Landscaping project, and how these projects are being implemented within a larger campus plan. Projects are diverse, including a large addition and renovation that modernized the facilities yet preserved some of classic architecture, a dorm remodel that addressed accessibility issues, the new construction of a welcoming center, and a multi-year, comprehensive landscaping project that features sustainability components.
 

By attending this workshop participants be able to: Learn the specifics of the projects that Grinnell College has implemented to address accessibility, sustainability, energy efficiency in some of their facilities. Understand how Grinnell College has utilized capital improvement projects to address the future needs of the college and its students. Learn about the collaboration efforts of multiple partners across multiple projects in various phases. Learn about the various initiatives undertaken by the project teams to deliver the projects while on an active campus, with specific attention to the needs of the students.

 

Presented by: Josh Miltenberger McGough Construction, Corey Hammond, Grinnell College, Brett Mendenhall, OPN Architects, Rick Boozell, SystemWorks (1 LU)

 

24. Future Vernaculars: Dwelling Ecosystems for Pacific Atolls [Design Discover Track]

This workshop centers around the Dwelling Ecosystems project -- a collaborative, real-world endeavor that strives to provide a solution to housing development in the Pacific, that is affordable, feasible, flexible, scalable, climate-resilient, and culturally connected. The Dwelling Ecosystem project is a counterpoint to current housing models in Micronesia. Course content will cover 1) how the presenters became involved in Design for Resilience, 2) what types of complex issues must be dealt with when designing in the Pacific, 3) what the status quo for Pacific housing is and why new solutions are needed, 4) how the project developed from a single individual house to a system of innovations at multiple levels (material, assembly, building, urban form, infrastructure, construction process), 5) what lessons have been learned and how the project has evolved to become a multidisciplinary partnership, and 6) ways in which the project hopes to have a positive impact in the community, well beyond the realm of architecture.

 

By attending this workshop participants will be able to: Summarize the environmental, historical, and socio-cultural contexts that influence design in the Pacific Atoll region, with emphasis on Climate Change, Traditional Knowledge, Community Health, and Current Housing Needs. Identify and compare the range of existing housing typologies found in the region, including traditional Micronesian, Japanese, and American, and discuss the pros / cons of each with respect to current needs. Explore the ways in which Culture, Climate, and Building Science come together to create opportunities for innovation at the scales of Material, Assembly, Building, and Urban Form, and how those can have positive benefits on Community Health and Livelihood. Plan for ways to balance Soft and Hard Approaches to achieving High-performance Building and Community Solutions, while still remaining low-impact in the context of Localized Material Loops and Building Cultures.

 

Presented by: Matthew Bunza, Metaamo Studio and James Miller, OCAD (1 LU HSW)

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